Let's preface a discussion of What's Your Number? by talking about the sort of audience that goes to see it: 1) A gaggle of women who like to make a joke out of being whorish and single 2) An old lady who thought it might be interesting to get a thrill from watching Chris Evans and Anna Faris skinny dip 3) A couple wherein the dude is either ugly enough to have to make these sort of concessions to his lady friend or he is actually really in love with her and is willing to make these sort of concessions to his lady friend and 4) Me, the unapologetic spinster at 24. Going into What's Your Number? with this audience in mind, the theme of the film was rather startling, but in a good way.

Although Anna Faris is typically associated with starring in fun, frothy movies, What's Your Number? actually makes an important comment on how much women are willing to compromise who they are for the sake of being in a relationship, even though, if you think about it, there has never been a better time to be alone considering all of the distractions provided by the twenty-first century. Still, the struggle for a single woman about to reach a certain age and searching for "the one" is a timeless story for a screenplay, and Anna Faris plays the role of quirky, recently fired Ally Darling to a tee.

After Ally breaks up with her umpteenth boyfriend in the wake of him telling her that accompanying her to her sister Daisy's (Ari Graynor) wedding feels "too serious," she encounters "6A," her neighbor across the hall who seems to let a different woman out of his apartment every morning. It is not until she is fired by her douche bag, ball-touching/finger smelling boss (Joel McHale) that she has the time to thumb through an issue of Marie Claire informing her that women who have slept with twenty or more men are not likely to get married. You know, men like a semi-pure bride even though, at the same time, they expect all women to put out on the first night.

This prompts Ally to enlist the services of Colin (Chris Evans), formerly only known to her as "6A," who casually mentions that he's good at digging up dirt because his dad used to be a cop. Colin finds nearly every last deadbeat swine on the list, including a Brit named Simon (The Office's Martin Freeman), a gross puppeteer named Gerry Perry (Andy Samberg, whose footage from the trailer sadly does not appear in the movie, but there is an extremely macabre/hilarious sex scene with him and Anna Faris), and Disgusting Donald (Parks and Recreation's Chris Pratt and, incidentally, Faris' husband). But the true "one that got away" is Jake Adams (Dave Annable), who represents just one of the twenty generic names on Ally's list.

But, before Colin can get Jake's contact information (he is a high-profile, wealthy member of the Boston community, making him more difficult to track down), Ally forms a close bond with him and, for the first time, feels like she can act like herself instead of the version of herself she feels is being projected onto her by either her mother (Blythe Danner) or her boyfriend of the moment. This leads to a game of strip basketball one night at the Garden (formally referred to as TD Banknorth Garden for you non-Bostonians), where all of their sexual tension finally leads to a kiss--but not sex, as Ally insists on "taking it slow."

Of course, Ally's amorous feelings are instantly dashed the next morning when Daisy and her bridesmaids dissuade her from pursuing anything further with Colin, who they view as a deadbeat musician that is "the guy you date before you meet the guy you're supposed to be with." Against Ally's better judgment, she listens to their advice, fueled by the added irritation that Colin lied to her about obtaining Jake Adams' phone number. She cuts their romance short by shouting, "I will not let another asshole into my heart--or my vagina!" Amen. Because that is the quintessential problem with women: They're so quick to settle, therefore perpetuating a cycle of mediocrity and low expectations. Fear not, though. It wouldn't be an Anna Faris movie without an upbeat conclusion.