Legendary musician, producer, and entrepreneur Quincy Jones has returned to the world of music, to release his first album in over 15 years. Never heard his stuff? Sure you have! He was the man behind the music on Michael Jackson’s chart topping album, Bad. Also, you’re probably a fan (or at least I am) of his beautiful daughter and actress Rashida Jones, from The Office/I Love You Man/Parks and Recreation.

Having a mainly jazz and funk related musical background, Quincy brings a mix of flows and flavors with his latest work, Q: Soul Bossa Nostra. While Quincy isn’t much on the singing, he brought out a stunning, almost 30 artists in to sing on the album. Sprinkled on the multi-genre-spanning  album, you’ll hear the likes youngsters  Akon, Ludacris, Amy Winehouse, Snoop Dogg, Robin Thicke, Talib Kweli and more, while bringing in the masters of the old school: Barry White and BeBe Winans to name a couple.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from such large scale collaboration with Quincy, Scott Storch, Red One, and Jermaine Dupri at the production helm, but I found the entire album very bounce/groove worthy. It’s one of those rare gems that can bring artists known for more adult language, but still manages to be amazing while keep the language G Rated.

The album had something for everyone, but as usual, I’ll give you my three favorite tracks spanning the album.

The second track, Strawberry Letter 23 is a love jam sung by pop icon Akon. As you would guess, the song samples heavily from The Brothers Johnson song of the same name. Why is this one of my favorites on the album? Well funk is amazing obviously, and I felt like this was the first Akon track that I actually LOVED. Usually Akon just isn’t my favorite, but I had to take my hat off on this collaboration.

Betcha Wouldn’t Hurt Me was a hell of a groove tune. The 9th track on the album, it’s a love story fronted by the boss lady herself, Mary J. Blige (who somehow has not lost one iota of her vocal prowess), with Q-Tip backing her up, and Alfredo Rodriguez on the piano. The song bleeds funk and soul, with a solid slap-bass arrangement, and high-note funk guitar.

I didn’t think I would love it as much as I did, but the rebuilt MJ classic of P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing) was pretty damn catchy. Singing the main vocals is the master of autotune himself, T-Pain, with Robin Thicke coming in for the second verse. I felt like this new version was more of tribute than trying to rip off a beat of a legend. Besides, Quincy Jones was so close with the late great King of Pop, that this was a welcome addition to the album.

The reason why I loved this album lies in terms with its surprise. For me, it was completely out of the blue. Quincy Jones is a man I would have always had a humble respect for, but with this new album, this clearly extends that respect that much further. The album was released on November 9th, so grab a copy ASAP!

Until next time my friends,

~Flak

Legendary musician, producer, and entrepreneur Quincy Jones has returned to the world of music, to release his first album in over 15 years. Never heard his stuff? Sure you have! He was the man behind the music on Michael Jackson’s chart topping album, Bad. Also, you’re probably a fan (or at least I am) of his beautiful daughter and actress Rashida Jones, from The Office/I Love You Man/Parks and Recreation.

Having a mainly jazz and funk related musical background, Quincy brings a mix of flows and flavors with his latest work, Q: Soul Bossa Nostra. While Quincy isn’t much on the singing, he brought out a stunning, almost 30 artists in to sing on the album. Sprinkled on the multi-genre-spanning album, you’ll hear the likes youngsters Akon, Ludacris, Amy Winehouse, Snoop Dogg, Robin Thicke, Talib Kweli and more, while bringing in the masters of the old school: Barry White and BeBe Winans to name a couple.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from such large scale collaboration with Quincy, Scott Storch, Red One, and Jermaine Dupri at the production helm, but I found the entire album very bounce/groove worthy. It’s one of those rare gems that can bring artists known for more adult language, but still manages to be amazing while keep the language G Rated.

The album had something for everyone, but as usual, I’ll give you my three favorite tracks spanning the album.

The second track, Strawberry Letter 23 is a love jam sung by pop icon Akon. As you would guess, the song samples heavily from The Brothers Johnson song of the same name. Why is this one of my favorites on the album? Well funk is amazing obviously, and I felt like this was the first Akon track that I actually LOVED. Usually Akon just isn’t my favorite, but I had to take my hat off on this collaboration.

Betcha Wouldn’t Hurt Me was a hell of a groove tune. The 9th track on the album, it’s a love story fronted by the boss lady herself, Mary J. Blige (who somehow has not lost one iota of her vocal prowess), with Q-Tip backing her up, and Alfredo Rodriguez on the piano. The song bleeds funk and soul, with a solid slap-bass arrangement, and high-note funk guitar.

I didn’t think I would love it as much as I did, but the rebuilt MJ classic of P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing) was pretty damn catchy. Singing the main vocals is the master of autotune himself, T-Pain, with Robin Thicke coming in for the second verse. I felt like this new version was more of tribute than trying to rip off a beat of a legend. Besides, Quincy Jones was so close with the late great King of Pop, that this was a welcome addition to the album.

The reason why I loved this album lies in terms with its surprise. For me, it was completely out of the blue. Quincy Jones is a man I would have always had a humble respect for, but with this new album, this clearly extends that respect that much further. The album was released on November 9th, so grab a copy ASAP!

Until next time my friends,

~Flak