With Alexander McQueen, Britain has proven once again that it is capable of producing higher caliber human beings than any other country. The man's mind was a literal amalgam of ceaseless and brilliant designs that put every other designer's limited concoctions to shame on the innovation front. In the wake of his suicide, there has undoubtedly been some elevation of his memory, but that elevation is extremely well-deserved.

If it were possible, I would try to commit every article of McQueen clothing to memory. Each piece is a window into some kind of truth that only he could have been capable of revealing. But the "Savage Beauty" exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is seemingly endless. The sensory overload factor is more intense than walking through Times Square. Every time you think the man couldn't possibly have come up with any other designs, there is another room to walk through. And, to boot, none of the garments, headpieces, shoes, or other miscellany are what could be termed "throwaway" or "filler" items. Every single product of McQueen's imagination is spun gold.

With each room devoted to a certain theme, "Savage Beauty" eases us in to McQueen's fashion perspicacity with pieces from his embryonic days in the field, even including some of the designs he created while at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. From there, the progression and intensity of his work is tangible--showcasing everything from "Romantic Gothic" to the "Cabinet of Curiosities" to "Romantic Nationalism" (one of the most notable aspects of the exhibition because of how much it speaks to McQueen's devotion to his Scottish heritage) to "Romantic Exoticism" to "Romantic Primitivism" to "Romantic Naturalism."

The deliberate use of the word "romantic" for each room display demonstrates that, in spite of McQueen being too twisted and intelligent for the rest of us, there are still a great many who understand that his creations were romantic, and often beautiful in their so-called ugliness. For, it is as McQueen said himself, "“People find my things sometimes aggressive. But I don’t see it as aggressive. I see it as romantic, dealing with a dark side of personality.” And, surely, no one knew more about the dark side of personality than he did.

The "Savage Beauty" exhibit is on display at the Met until August 7th, 2011. And, believe me, it is well worth the fucking hour and a half wait you will inevitably have to endure in order to get in.