For a film as overtly commercial as Horrible Bosses 2, one might not expect such controversial issues as nymphomania and homophobia to be addressed, and yet, they are--albeit in a manner displayed with concerning levity and non-existent profundity. The follow up to Seth Gordon's 2011 movie (now directed by Sean Anders, the man who has also brought you Dumb and Dumber To in the same year--he's a sequels lover apparently) manages to prove that American audiences have no idea how to deal with serious subject matters unless they're transformed into farce. 

A light-hearted look at nymphomania

A light-hearted look at nymphomania

With the precedent set by the "faux" gaydom of Seth Rogen and James Franco, it seems the only way mainstream audiences can handle homosexuality is if two or more straight men are parodying it in an over the top way. From the very beginning of the film, we're given laughs via the old pantomimed hand job bit as Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) and Dale (Charlie Day) demonstrate how their invention, the "Shower Buddy," works on a morning television show.

Somewhat gay

Somewhat gay

And then there is the fact that Kurt's ring tone is "Roar" by Katy Perry, a running joke throughout the movie. Scratching the surface of Americans' uncomfortableness with homosexuality if it's taken seriously, Horrible Bosses 2 will undoubtedly be looked back upon as a relic of how gay people were handled in pop culture decades from now.

Promotional poster for Horrible Bosses 2

Promotional poster for Horrible Bosses 2

As for the nymphomaniacal aspect of the story, covered with caricature-like grace by Jennifer Aniston as Julia Harris, we're given a snapshot of a woman whose hypersexuality is demonized in a way that's really saying: "If you're a slut (a.k.a. overly enjoy sex as a woman), no one is going to take you seriously." Considering this movie was designed for the Midwestern demographic, these archetypes are not surprising, though they are somewhat played at this point in the twenty-first century.